Dating royal doulton pottery

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For almost 200 years, Doulton products have been considered to be among the finest in quality and craftsmanship.Since its inception, the company started by John Doulton, did business using the following names: The beautiful ceramic pieces being produced by Doulton & Company in the late 1800s were noticed by the British Royal family including Queen Victoria.We also feature an extensive collection of Royal Doulton character jugs and toby jugs which have become very collectible since the 1930s. Within ten years he had enlarged the factory three times, built a china works, taken on the largest and most gifted group of artists in the Potteries, and developed for Doulton a reputation for craftsmanship and artistry still identified with Royal Doulton today. The following are two typical examples found on the patterns Rouen and Kew. The printed or impressed word HOLBEIN is also found on some examples of this particular ware.Royal Doulton got its start in 1815 as Doulton Pottery, an industrial stoneware company in Lambeth, England, that made ale and porter bottles, covered jars, and garden vases, as well as outdoor statues and fountains.

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Famous artists represented in the HN figurine collection include Charles Noke, Leslie Harradine and Peggy Davies.

Between 1878 (when Henry and James Doulton acquired the major interest in the Pinder, Bourne factory in Nile Street, Burslem) and 1882 (when the name of the firm was changed to Doulton & Company, Burslem) existing Pinder, Bourne marks continued in use, such as the name in full: PINDER BOURNE CO.: and the initials P. Introduced in the latter part of 1901 to mark the grant of the Royal Warrant by King Edward VII together with the specific right to use the word ROYAL to designate Doulton products.

Several of these were adopted after 1882 by Doulton and remained in use for about twenty years. Occasionally found also between 19 along with B.7 but the later Holbein Wares were not always specifically marked.

The founder’s son, Henry Doulton, who joined the company in 1835, brought in a young artist named George Tinworth, whom he charged with establishing an art pottery studio at the Lambeth factory in 1867.

By the mid-1880s, Tinworth’s studio employed 300 artists to make ornamental vases and decorative figurines from stoneware or terracotta.

At the Lambeth stoneware studio, Tinworth also produced series of portly kids playing and anthropomorphic animals in high-fired salt-glaze stoneware.

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